Introduction to Solar Systems Astronomy - Arizona State University

edX
Online

Kostenlos

Wichtige informationen

  • Kurs
  • Online
  • Wann:
    Freie Auswahl
Beschreibung

Explore the exciting world of modern solar systems astronomy in this credit-eligible course.With this course you earn while you learn, you gain recognized qualifications, job specific skills and knowledge and this helps you stand out in the job market.

Wichtige informationen
Veranstaltungsort(e)

Wo und wann

Beginn Lage
Freie Auswahl
Online

Was lernen Sie in diesem Kurs?

Astronomy
systems
Science
Solar Systems
Discovery Channel

Themenkreis

In this introductory 4-credit hour lecture and laboratory course, we will explore the origins, structure, contents, and evolution of our solar system and exosolar planetary systems. We will cover the history of astronomy, properties of light, instruments, the study of the solar system and nearby stars. Throughout the course, we will learn about the Discovery Channel Telescope, the Lowell Observatory, the Challenger Space Center, and Meteor Crater, the world’s best-preserved meteorite impact site on Earth. We will also get a chance to virtually walk through the Lunar Exploration Museum and Arizona State University’s Moeur Building, home of the Mars Space Flight Facility where ASU scientists and researchers are using spacecraft instruments on Mars to explore the geology and mineralogy of the red planet. This course satisfies the Natural Science — Quantitative (SQ) general studies requirement at Arizona State University. Introduction to Astronomy may satisfy a general education requirement at other institutions; however, it is strongly encouraged that you consult with your institution of choice to determine how these credits will be applied to their degree requirements prior to transferring the credit.

Zusätzliche Informationen

Dr. Frank Timmes Dr. Frank Timmes is an astrophysicist who is interested in the universe's evolving composition and its implications for life in the universe. His current research focuses on nuclear astrophysics, especially synthesis of the periodic table. Present efforts include the physics and modeling of reactive fluid flows in stellar environments, supernovae and explosions of all sorts, cosmic chemical evolution, and gamma-ray emission from radioactive isotopes. This research involves analytical models, desktop calculations, large-scale parallel computations, comparison with existing high-quality observations or experiments, and creating testable predictions. He holds a B.S. in Physics from UC Santa Barbara, and M.S. & Ph.D. in Astronomy & Astrophysics from UC Santa Cruz.