International Business House

International Maritime Regulations

International Business House
In Astana (Kazakhstan)

1.929 
*Orientierungspreis
Originalpreis in GBP:
£ 1.700

Wichtige informationen

Tipologie Kurs
Ort Astana (Kazakhstan)
Dauer 5 Days
Beginn nach Wahl
  • Kurs
  • Astana (Kazakhstan)
  • Dauer:
    5 Days
  • Beginn:
    nach Wahl
Beschreibung

The shipping industry in a global economy and Maritime Capability. Who's who in the maritime industry. Managing and crewing ships New Tonnage Sale and purchase of Second-hand ships The process of Registering Ships Introduction to Maritime Law The chartering of ships Insurance and Salvage UNCLOS, IMO and ILO conventions and how they are implemented The key maritime conventions. The important codes for administrations to implement to encourage quality shipping. The Responsibilities of the Flag State The Responsibilities of Port State Control Attracting shipping to a flag State.
Suitable for: Benefit from this practical guide to ship registration on how to increase your competitive edge through flag choice and register performance.

Einrichtungen (1)
Wo und wann
Beginn Lage
nach Wahl
Astana
Kazahstan, Kazakhstan
Beginn nach Wahl
Lage
Astana
Kazahstan, Kazakhstan

Was lernen Sie in diesem Kurs?

Transport Management
Shipping

Themenkreis

DAY ONE: An Introducing the Maritime Industry

Session One: The shipping industry in a global economy and Maritime Capability

At the end of this session participants will be able to understand the important aspects of the shipping industry in a global economy:

That Shipping is dependent on international trade and there are distinct global trading patterns
Recognising the global maritime capability
The key shipping markets
Recognising where the global maritime capability lies in 2010
Recognise the key types of vessels currently employed
Identifying the impact that global recession had on shipping and in particular Caspian Sea trade.
This session will discuss the fact that in a global economy, no nation is self-sufficient. Each is involved at different levels in trade to sell what it produces, to acquire what it lacks and also to produce more efficiently in some economic sectors than its trade partners. It will also cover the value and size of world merchandise trade and explain that all the major sectors including energy, raw materials, agriculture and manufactured goods rely on shipping.

Session Two: Who's who in the maritime industry.

At the end of this session participants will be able to understand the family of people in the maritime industry and the roles they play including:


The World: Governments, the public at large and media.
The Industry: the customers (shippers and those requiring a shipping service) Insurers, banks
The Industry Regulators: UN, IMO, ILO, ISO, IEC, industry governments and NGOs.
The Legislators: National administrations (Flag States) Class, Professional bodies and trade associations
The ship owners: May be a single operator or a huge multinational. Translate business need and context into specification with the help of naval architects, engineers and shipyard specialists.
Owners operate and manage ships sometimes by sub contracting responsibilities, but they will choose the flag state for their ships.
The Seafarers and their trainers. The so called IMO white list.
The Inspectors: Government Inspectors will visit ships and shipping companies for operational safety crew competence and safe manning levels.

Session Three: Managing and crewing ships

At the end of this session participants will be able to recognise the key aspects of a global maritime capability including:

How ships are managed
How ships are manned
The shortage of skills that challenges the industry
Education and training
The international requirements for maritime education and training
TABLE TOP EXCERCISE ONE: Research the types of ships which operate in the Caspian Sea and find out who their owners are. What trades do these vessel work in?

DAY TWO: Building, Buying and Registering Ships


Session Four: New Tonnage

At the end of this session participants will be able to understand the important aspects of purchasing new ships including:


Who are today’s key ship builders
How are ships built today
Flag States involvement in registering new ships including procedure and documentaion.
The involvement of Classification Societies during building
What application applies to particular vessels

Session Five: Sale and purchase of Second-hand ships

At the end of this session participants will be able to understand the important aspects of sale and purchase of ships including:

Recognise the key elements in sale and purchase contracts.
Be aware of Flag States involvement if second-hand ships change registry
Registration and Documents required for change of owner/class/registry
TABLE TOP EXCERCISE TWO: Referring to the information gained yesterday research into which Flag states are these ships registered. Why do you think these Flag States were chosen?

Session Six: The process of Registering Ships

At the end of this session participants will be able to understand the important aspects of registering ships including:

Recognise the types of Registry
Strengths and limitations of various types of registration
National Registers
International registers
Open Registers
Be aware of Dual Registry
The commercial factors of registration
A register’s infrastructure and records kept

DAY THREE: The Commercial Aspects of Shipping


Session Seven: Introduction to Maritime Law

At the end of this session participants will be able to understand the important aspects of maritime law and legal systems including:


Sources & Origins of Maritime Law
The difference between a common law and civil law system
How equity, contract law and the law of tort normally apply in maritime jurisdictions
The benefits of arbitration
The international legal staus of the Caspian Sea.
Session Eight: The chartering of ships

At the end of this session participants will be able to understand the important aspects of ship chartering including:

Bareboat Charters
Advantages and disadvantages of Bare boat registration
Interelationship between bareboat and primary registration.
Time and voyage charters
Demise and disponent owners
Bills of lading and sea waybills
Hague, Hague-visby, Hamburg and Rotterdam rules
Seaworthiness and cargoworthiness
Charter fixture negotiations
Ship Broking and the Baltic Exchange

Session Nine: Insurance and Salvage

At the end of this session participants will be able to understand the important aspects of maritime Insurance and salvage including:

The nature of maritime insurance
Hull and Machinery
P&I Club cover
War and strike risks
Cargo, FD&D. Loss of earnings and other policies
General average
Salvage and Lloyds Open Form and recent improvements on LOF
The responsibilities of wreck removal

DAY FOUR: The Governance of Shipping

Session Ten: UNCLOS, IMO and ILO conventions and how they are implemented

At the end of this session participants will be able to recognise how the important maritime conventions are created and implemented:

United Nations Convention on the Law of the Seas (including Flag States)
Role of the IMO and ILO
The members of IMO and ILO and the roles they play
The Administrations responsibility to ratify conventions

Session Eleven: The key maritime conventions.

At the end of this session participants will be able to recognise the important maritime conventions including:

Safety of Life at Sea
Standards for Training and Watchkeeping
Marine Environment Protection Conventions
The ILO Maritime Convention
Load Line Convention
Tonnage Convention
Wreck removal
Ballast water management
Antifouling convention

Session Twelve: The important codes for administrations to implement to encourage quality shipping.

At the end of this session participants will be able to recognise the important maritime codes that administrations are directly involved in including:

International Safety Management CodeInternational Ship and Port facility Security Code
The Maritime Dangerous Goods Code
The ILO/IMO fair treatment for seafarers guidelines
Safer operations to meet falg state requirements ultimately saves costs whereas neglect has a negative impact on ship’s operations and profit
Particularly in times of recession maintaining the status of vessel’s flag and class is important

DAY FIVE: The Challenge for National Administrations

Session Thirteen. The Responsibilities of the Flag State

At the end of this session participants will be able to recognise the Responsibilities of Flag state administrations including:

Having the infrastructure in terms of qualified and competent staff, offices and equipment, to meet its obligations under international treaties
Ratifying the principal international maritime treaties, including those adopted by IMO and ILO.
Establishing appropriate controls over organisations, such as classification societies, nominated to conduct statutory surveys of ships on their behalf.
Aiming to be placed on the IMO STCW ‘white list’
Implementing the requirements of the ILO Maritime Labour Convention,
Safe manning levels for ships and issue safe manning documents, in accordance with the provisions of IMO Resolution A.8902.
Enforcing minimum seafarers’ rest hours that comply with the ILO Maritime Labour Convention (MLC 2006)3 in addition to the IMO STCW Convention
Investigating any ‘serious’ and ‘very serious’ casualty occurring to its ships, as soon as practicable after the casualty
IMO Member state audit scheme
Movement of ships between flags
Repatriation of seafarers

Session Fourteen. The Responsibilities of Port State Control

At the end of this session participants will be able to recognise the Responsibilities of Port State Control including:

The positive aims of PSC
Following the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which sets the standards and targeting of ships
Following The ILO and IMO PSC guidelines
The white, grey and Black lists
Ensuring that foreign merchant ships visiting its ports comply with the standards laid down in the relevant conventions.
Detentions and the rules of non compliance issues.
The relationship between port and flag states.

Session Fifteen. Attracting shipping to a flag State

At the end of this session participants will be able to consider ways of attracting ships to a flag state including:


The Flag as a Symbol of Nationality
Location
Regulation operational and Social issues
Excellent communications and 24 hour service
Experience and reputation
Political stability
Financial recognition and the ability to quickle recored ship mortgages
Tonnage tax?
Laying up procedures, what is needed and how Flag states can help
Re-ommissioning tonnage after lay up
Final Table top Exercise: Two Groups
Gp1 What will you propose to make your Flag State attractive to potential owners?
Gp2 How would you choose a flag for your vessel?
Summary and conclusion of the weeks work