EMAGISTER CUM LAUDE
Middlesex University

LLM/PGDip/PGCert Commercial Law

Middlesex University
In London (England)

Preis auf Anfrage

Wichtige informationen

Tipologie Postgraduate
Ort London (England)
Dauer 1
Beginn nach Wahl
  • Postgraduate
  • London (England)
  • Dauer:
    1
  • Beginn:
    nach Wahl
Beschreibung

Overview
The degree aims to enable students to specialise in subjects related to commercial law, equipping them with comprehensive knowledge of the regulatory framework governing the conduct of trade, business and financial services set up by English and international law.
Why study LLM/PGDip/PGCert Commercial Law at Middlesex University?
You will deepen and broaden your knowledge of law as an academic subject through acquiring a systematic understanding of legal processes, methods and concepts, of the social and political context in which legal processes take place, and of appropriate theoretical conceptions of law.
By maximising your academic potential and refining your problem-solving skills in a transnational context by acquiring a systematic and critical understanding of the complex legal, economic, cultural and political issues informing the English and international regulations addressing commercial transactions you will enhance your professional development and horizons.
The research and writing skills you gain will be transferable to a variety of professional sectors, including the legal profession, policymaking, corporate sector, governmental bodies or academia.
The teaching team in the School of Law at Middlesex University includes Dr Sara Hourani and Dr Lijun Zhao, an expert on international trade law and international maritime law.
Course highlights
This LLM degree introduces students to actual business disputes, exposing them to the changing nature both of commercial disputes and their settlement or resolution
Become conversant with case law, UK, EU and international statute pertinent to the conduct of business, together with trends and new issues arising as a result of both technological and regulatory change
In alternative to litigation, this course familiarises students with the range of alternative dispute resolution mechanisms deployed in business contexts.

Einrichtungen (1)
Wo und wann
Beginn Lage
nach Wahl
London
The Burroughs, NW4 4BT, London, England
Karte ansehen
Beginn nach Wahl
Lage
London
The Burroughs, NW4 4BT, London, England
Karte ansehen

Was lernen Sie in diesem Kurs?

IT Law
Property Law
Human Rights
Intellectual Property
Human Rights Law
EU Law
Politics
Corporate Governance
Employment Law
Commercial Law
International Trade
Governance
IT
Office IT
English
LLM
International
Global
Law
University
Property
systems
Writing
Trade
Dispute Resolution
Skills and Training
Research skills
Human Rights
Litigation
Arbitration
Integrated Learning
Dismissal Law

Themenkreis

Course content

What will you study on the LLM/PGDip/PGCert Commercial Law?

Full-time LLM (1 year, 180 credits)

  • Four core plus two optional modules are completed over terms one and two, with a Dissertation period in term three.

Part-time LLM (2 years, 180 credits)

  • Four core plus two optional modules are completed over four taught terms, plus a Dissertation period
  • Two modules in term one, two modules in term two, and two modules in the first term of the following academic year.

PG Diploma (1 year, 120 credits)

  • Four core plus two optional modules completed over four taught terms
  • Two modules in term one, two modules in term two, and two modules in the first term of the following academic year.

PG Certificate (60 credits)

  • Legal Research Skills must be taken in term one, plus two optional modules
  • Can be completed in one or two academic terms.

For all pathways, attendance may be required during the day and/or evening, depending on your choice of modules.

Modules

Each module is typically worth 20 credits, except the Dissertation, Work Integrated Learning and Practicum in International Organisations modules which are worth 60 credits each. The Work Integrated Learning and Practicum in International Organisations may be chosen to replace the Dissertation with prior agreement.

Not all of the optional modules listed will be available in any one year. Module availability is dependent on staffing and the number of students wishing to take each module.

  • Core modules
    • English Commercial Law (20 Credits) - Compulsory

      Understand and analyse contemporary issues, legal problems and emergent changes to legislation governing the conduct of trade, business and financial services.

    • International Commercial Litigation and Arbitration (20 Credits) - Compulsory

      Gain the knowledge necessary to deal with contemporary and emerging challenges in the practise and management of transnational commercial disputes with a focus on the increasing use of arbitration for expediency and cost savings by medium and large-scale enterprises operating in multiple jurisdictions.

    • Law of the International Sale of Goods (20 Credits) - Compulsory

      This module presumes familiarity with the principles of contract law and extends these into the international arena in the field of international sale of goods. It deals with the English law governing trade in wet and dry commodities and international law, principally the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods. It aims to enhance the student's ability to tackle the practical, policy and economic implications of legal regimes enabling trade and transactions between parties divided by or purposely straddling legal and geographic boundaries.

    • Legal Research Skills (20 Credits) - Compulsory

      This module equips students with essential research skills necessary to complete a master's of law successfully, including the technical and conventional systems governing academic writing and the principles and practice followed in legal reasoning.

  • Plus one of the following:
    • Dissertation (60 Credits) - Optional

      The Dissertation module is taught in term two, and assessed by a 15,000-18,000 dissertation. Students demonstrate expert-level knowledge and advanced-level legal research skills by writing a dissertation paper, supported by a supervisor, on a topic proposed by the student and approved by the module leader, Dr Lughaidh Kerin.

      Eligible LLM students can replace this module with the Work Integrated Learning or Practicum in International Organisations module with prior approval.

    • Practicum in International Organisation (60 Credits) - Optional

      This module enables students to undertake work experience in an international organisation for 12 weeks. Examples of organisations where students from Middlesex have completed their placement include the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and the Building and Woodworkers International global union federation, as well as a range of NGOs and other UN agencies in Geneva.

      Students keep a diary of their work documenting the acquisition of transferable skills, plus produce an original 4,000-word academic paper which indicates understanding of the organisation where the placement took place.

    • Work Integration Learning (60 Credits) - Optional

      This module enables students to undertake work experience in an international organisation for 12 weeks. Examples of organisations where students from Middlesex have completed their placement include the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and the Building and Woodworkers International global union federation, as well as a range of NGOs and other UN agencies in Geneva.

      Students keep a diary of their work documenting the acquisition of transferable skills, plus produce an original 4,000-word academic paper which indicates understanding of the organisation where the placement took place.

  • Plus two of the following optional modules
    • Business and Human Rights (20 Credits) - Optional

      The Bophal disaster, the tragedy of the Niger Delta and the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory are all examples of what appears to be systematic corporate human rights abuses which are not being adequately prevented or remedied. This module enables students to understand how the sub-discipline business and human rights challenges State-centred architecture of international human rights law and delves into the responsibility of non-state actors such as multinational corporations in the area of human rights. It also challenges the idea that only individuals can commit international crimes such as genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes looking into corporate criminal and civil liability for human rights violations.

    • Comparative Corporate Governance (20 Credits) - Optional

      An in-depth look at a range of contemporary issues of EU Law and governance enabling students to critically analyse and evaluate the European Union's institutional structures and methods of integration as well as their underlying tensions.

    • Contemporary issues of European Union Law Governance (20 Credits) - Optional

      An in-depth look at a range of contemporary issues of EU Law and governance enabling students to critically analyse and evaluate the European Union's institutional structures and methods of integration as well as their underlying tensions.

    • Dismissal Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      Gain a comprehensive understanding of the common law and statutory principles governing the termination of contracts of employment in the UK.

    • European Human Rights Law and Practice (20 Credits) - Optional

      This module engages students with the legal, political and philosophical perspectives of the legal frameworks, institutions and remedies available to protect fundamental rights in Europe, both under the European Convention on Human Rights and the European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights.

    • European Union Free Movement, Immigration and Asylum and Policy (20 Credits) - Optional

      Acquire detailed and wide-ranging knowledge of EU laws on free movement of persons, immigration, asylum and border management, and learn how these laws are implemented in practice.

    • European Union Law in Action (20 Credits) - Optional

      Gain an advanced knowledge and understanding of the European Union's policy and legislative making processes, and the mechanism and tools by which the European Union seeks to promote participatory democracy. Attractive to students interested in making an impact on the contemporary and controversial policy and legislative issues governed by the EU.

    • Foundations and Principles of International Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      Enable students to analyse, critically evaluate and provide authoritative commentary on how international law impacts international relations and contemporary concerns such as globalisation, the use of armed force, terrorism, poverty, governance and the regulation of ownership over territory.

    • Individual Employment Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      Focus on contractual employment relationships and the practical impact of the statutory rights on the operation of employment relationships in the UK.

    • Intellectual Property Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      Equips students with systematic understanding of the relevant national and international regimes governing intellectual property focusing on English and EU law including case law, as well as the measures specified by the agreements on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs) and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

    • International Criminal Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      Develop an understanding of the international body of law prohibiting international crimes viewed as atrocities (genocide, crimes against humanity, aggression and war crimes) and to make perpetrators criminally accountable for their perpetration under national and international jurisdictions.

    • International Human Rights Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      To analyse the international human rights law framework under the United Nations and assess its monitoring procedures and efficacy, engaging the complementary American, African and Asian regional systems. Students will be required to reflect on challenges to the implementation of international human rights law globally, as well as engage strategies that advance thematic and country-specific elements of the human rights bodies under the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. The module will involve critical research on international human rights mechanisms, including treaty-based and Charter-based bodies, as well as regional commissions and courts. The aim is to reach a comprehensive understanding of the full range of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, and the interaction between domestic, regional and international law in their protection, realisation and fulfilment. Students will be tasked with evolving a rights-based analysis to identify and address gaps that contribute to widespread contemporary global rights violations.

    • International Humanitarian Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      The module seeks to provide post-graduate students with a general introduction to international humanitarian law, to the extent that it restricts the means and methods of warfare and protects the victims of armed conflict. Students will be required to analyse the protection provided by this body of law and to reflect critically on compliance with the law by both state and non-state actors in particular situations. The aim is for students to attain a comprehensive understanding of international humanitarian law, its relationship with other bodies of law (including international human rights law), the limitations that currently exist with regard to enforcement, and the possibilities for the future development of the law.

    • International Maritime Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      Equips students with detailed knowledge and understanding of English and international normative frameworks regulating the carriage of goods by sea and the laws governing maritime causalities and their aftermath, such as collision, oil pollution, salvage and general average.

    • International Organisations and the International Dispute Resolution (20 Credits) - Optional

      Get advanced conceptual insights into the legal, political and structural issues that underpin dispute resolution within international organisations through a thematic focus on issues such as labour, trade, title to territory and international peace and security. You will learn to think strategically about different means of settlement of disputes and their applicability to existing or potential conflicts.

    • International Whistleblowing Law and Practice (20 Credits) - Optional

      Gain an understanding of the different legal approaches to protecting whistleblowers and the theories used to explain why some people choose to whistleblow while others remain silent.

    • Law and Policy of the World Trade Organisation (20 Credits) - Optional

      This module is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of global trade regimes through an overview of globalisation and contemporary international economic relations; the regulation of international trade by the WTO; and the relationship between international trade, harmonisation of the law and trade-related issues.

    • Minority Rights and Indigenous People in International Law (20 Credits) - Optional

      This module enables students to understand, analyse and comment upon the international law framework on minority rights and indigenous peoples under the United Nations, American, European, African and Asian systems, assessing their efficacy in dealing with violations.

    • UK and European Anti-Discrimination (20 Credits) - Optional

      Understand, analyse and asses the relevant regulations at national and European level governing discrimination as well as the practical, historical, social, economic, ethical and philosophical context in which these operate.

You can find more information about this course in the programme specification. Module and programme information is indicative and may be subject to change.